Hon.Brian Scavo

Hon.Brian Scavo
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Tuesday, January 7, 2014

CYBER BULLYING YOU WONT CARE UNLESS IT HAPPENS TO YOU, by Brian Scavo

CYBERBULLYING THE EASIEST WAY TO DESTROY SOMEONES REPUTATION

CYBER BULLYING YOU WONT CARE UNLESS IT HAPPENS TO YOU.

Albany : NY : USA | Nov 03, 2013 at 10:21 AM PST      DONATE HERE

Hon. Brian Scavo expert on Cyber bullying and School bullying

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WHAT IS CYBER BULLYING                       DONATE HERE
Hon. Brian Scavo expert on web and school bullying
Brian Scavo has taken direct action against cyber bullying by creating the toughest law against cyber bullying in New York State!
http://www.brianscavovscyberbullying.blogspot.com join Brian on twitter and facebook
Cyber bullying involves being intentionally hurtful of other people through electronic communication. It can take place through a variety of digital means. The goal of cyber bullies is generally to intimidate the victim or damage her reputation. Cyber bullies may instigate or escalate arguments by text message or chat. They can send harassing emails. Some cyber bullies spread gossip or rumors on social networking sites or other websites. Identity theft is sometimes also involved in cyber bullying. Bullies pretend to be someone else and send or post material as that person. Some bullies pretend to befriend the victim in order to obtain private information which they then share publicly. Girls will often cyber bully through social exclusion. For example, one girl in a group might be ostracized and "unfriended" on social networking sites. In extreme cases, cyber bullying can turn into cyber stalking. These cases involve threats that can leave the victim feeling very fearful. Cyber bullying often escalates quickly and more severely than regular bullying because the perpetrators do not see the emotional toll that they take on the victim. Some bullies act anonymously, leaving even more room for cruelty behind an electronic veil. The Effects of Bullying on Your Child with Social Anxiety More About Cyber Bullying Sources: University of Massachusetts Medical School. Parent Guide to Cyberbullying and Cyberthreats. Accessed August 24, 2013.
Also Known As: cyber stalking, electronic harassment More About Cyber Bullying What are the Consequences of Cyber Bullying? Interview with Tori Wilson - 'One Life to Live' and Cyber-Bullying Does Cyber Bullying Exist In the Figure Skating World? Bullying Information Types of Bullying Reactive Bullying Definition Bullying Basics How Addressing Bullying Behavior Prevents Lifelong Bullying 10 Common Myths and Misconceptions about Bullying Bullying and the Disabled Teen Related Articles What is Cyber Bullying? Surprising Ways Girls Bully Differently Effects of Bullying Bullying -
Definition of Bullying 6 Consequences Bully-Victims Experience   
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An attempt to end cyber-bullying in Albany County

Posted: Aug 24, 2010 9:08 PM EDT
BY STEVE PACER
ALBANY, N.Y. - Unlike most young adults, Kevin Collado avoids social networking web sites like facebook, because he says he's been a victim of cyber-bullying. The 23-year-old would rather not go online, sick and tired of repeatedly having to face the attacks.
"There's some nasty people out there that are continuously on you," Collado said. "So, I just try to avoid it and not use the computer and that's it."
If Albany County Legislator Brian Scavo has his way, cyber-bullying will soon be a misdemeanor, punishable by a $1,000 fine and possibly up to a year in a jail.
"This is something that needs to go national," Scavo said. "But, in the meantime, the Albany County Legislature needs to step up, and do something to protect the people of Albany County."
There are still some details to be worked out on local law F, as it's titled, like how to enforce the law and how to do it in a cost-effective way. Scavo says this is a serious issue that can't be ignored.
"What we're doing is trying to protect people and save lives," he said. "There's no partisan politics in this. It's all about helping people and saving lives.
Helping people, saving lives, and most importantly, giving cyber bullies a concrete reason to quit their online antics.
"People will think twice before they start doing things," said Collado.
Similar laws already exist in Rensselaer County and Suffolk County on Long Island. Albany County's Legislature is expected to vote on theirs sometime this fall.

Four students suspended for GHS rap

GUILDERLAND — Four Guilderland High School students, all males, have been suspended for posting to YouTube a rap song that, according to the high school principal, made derogatory references to named female students.
Principal Thomas Lutsic, who said he “unfortunately” listened to the five-minute recording , was asked to describe it.  “There was not a clear message. There were raunchy sexual comments,” he told The Enterprise yesterday. “It was very explicit about these young ladies.”
The district is not releasing the names of the students who made the rap.
Separate from school discipline, the Guilderland Police are conferring with the Albany County District Attorney’s Office about the possibility of arrests.
In 2010, Albany County adopted a law, introduced by Brian Scavo, making cyberbullying a crime.  A Cohoes youth was arrested under that county law for a Facebook page targeting other youth; that case will now be considered by the state’s top court in a three-tiered system, the Court of Appeals.
The youth pleaded guilty in Cohoes City Court to Albany County Local Law #11 of 2010, making it a misdemeanor to engage in cyberbulling in the county, according to Court of Appeals spokesman Gary Spencer. The case, which will be heard some time next year, he said, is a constitutional challenge to the law and to the way it was applied in this case; the challenge alleges that the county law is a violation of First Amendment rights.
Guilderland had created a policy on cyberbullying well before the state enacted the Dignity for All Students Act in 2012, requiring  districts to come up with policies that dealt with cyberbullying both on and off school grounds.
The Guilderland policy specifies that cyberbullying and threats can occur on or off school property, both during and outside school hours. “Even if a student receives a threatening message at home, such message can directly impact the psychological and emotional well being of that individual,” it says.
The policy defines cyberbullying and cyberthreats; encourages victims to go to adults, like parents or teachers; and creates a process through which the victims can get help.
Roger Ginder, who heads the Community Services Unit for the Guilderland Police, described the rap recording as “pretty obscene and vulgar.” He also said, “It’s disheartening to the parents of the victims.”
Ginder said the recording featured just a single still photo of the Guilderland High School sign.
A parent of one of the students named in the audio clip called the Guilderland Police Department about it on Tuesday morning, Ginder said, and the investigation is being handled by the school resource officer, Nick Ingle.
Ingle did not return a call seeking comment yesterday.
Ginder also said it was his understanding that, while the school requested of YouTube that the clip be removed, it was one of the posters who ultimately removed it.
Ginder said that the Guilderland Police have been conferring with the Albany County District Attorney’s Office to see if arrests can be made or if “it falls under freedom of speech.”
Cecilia Walsh, spokeswoman for the district attorney’s office, said, “This is ongoing so our office is unable to comment.”
Ginder also said, “People have to realize things placed on the Internet are there forever…Often kids think because they’re anonymous, they can’t be traced.”
He went on about online postings, “Things they say or do can be hurtful. It’s not like years ago with a rumor that disappears after a week. It stays out there.”
Asked how the four accused students were found, Lutsic said only, “It was brought to our attention.”
He went on, “The vast majority are appalled by this happening and would do the right thing.”
Asked for the boys’ reaction, Lutsic said, “All did say it was a mistake.”
A superintendent’s hearing will determine any further disciplinary actions from the school.
Lutsic noted the school year starts with assemblies that, among other things, cover Dignity for All Students Act regulations and cyberbullying.
Lutsic sent a letter to parents dated Nov. 12 that said, “Earlier today, school officials were notified that an explicit audio clip had been posted to the website YouTube containing the names of several Guilderland High School students. The clip contained obscene and harassing language, and as a result, the district has contacted YouTube to request that the audio clip be removed from the website immediately.
“We take very seriously our responsibility to provide a safe learning environment for our students….” (See related story on school safety at Guilderland.)
Counseling has been offered to the victims, said Lutsic, and he and the school superintendent, Marie Wiles, held a press conference about the matter Wednesday afternoon because they had received so many calls from the media.
Editor’s note: Melissa Hale-Spencer is married to the Court of Appeals spokesman.
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Wednesday, November 13, 2013

GUILDERLAND STUDENTS SUSPENDED OVER CYBERBULLYING VIDEO

Hon. Brian Scavo expert on Cyber bullying and School bullying


Brian Scavo has taken direct action against Cyber bullying by creating the toughest law against Cyber bullying  in New York State!



Four students at Guilderland High School were suspended after an explicit video went viral. Innae Park spoke with school officials and has more. 

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GUILDERLAND, N.Y. -- "It was definitely vulgar. It was obscene," said Guilderland Police Sgt. Roger Ginder.
"I was stunned," said Guilderland Superintendent Dr. Marie Wiles.
Four Guilderland High School students have been suspended for an explicit rap video posted to YouTube this week. The song that targeted a number of sophomores has been taken down, but the impacts are long-lasting.
"We had our counseling department and social workers talk to all students mentioned," said Guilderland High School Principal Tom Lutsic.
Ginder said, "It definitely falls into cyber bullying."
Not only is the district investigating, but so are police. With cyber bullying a crime under Albany County law, Sgt. Roger Ginder believes they will have a strong case.
"We want to make sure if there are going to be charges, they stick, so that's why we're working with the District Attorney's office," Ginder said.
Both the district and department say they've pushed for an anti-bullying culture. But the lessons are still developing.
Ginder said, "I do know we're getting more cases like this, but the nice part is, we're also getting people who are coming forward that weren't part of it."
"We will turn this into a positive. What that'll look like, I can't say today, but that is what we do here, as educators," Wiles said.
The four male students will face a superintendent's hearing sometime in the next four school days. No charges have been filed against those young men at this time.

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GUILDERLAND, N.Y. -- Guilderland High School's principal has reached out to YouTube to have an explicit rap video pulled from the website, after they say it mentioned several students in a case of cyberbullying.
High school officials sent a letter home to parents on Tuesday about the video, saying they're reached out to Guilderland Police to investigate. Police and the school's resource officer are now trying to figure out who posted the video.
In the letter, Principal Thomas Lutsic encourages parents to talk about the dangers of cyberbullying with their kids and asks them to reach out if they have any questions.

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Four students suspended for GHS rap  

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GUILDERLAND — Four Guilderland High School students, all males, have been suspended for posting to YouTube a rap song that, according to the high school principal, made derogatory references to named female students.
Principal Thomas Lutsic, who said he “unfortunately” listened to the five-minute recording , was asked to describe it.  “There was not a clear message. There were raunchy sexual comments,” he told The Enterprise yesterday. “It was very explicit about these young ladies.”
The district is not releasing the names of the students who made the rap.
Separate from school discipline, the Guilderland Police are conferring with the Albany County District Attorney’s Office about the possibility of arrests.
In 2010, Albany County adopted a law, introduced by Brian Scavo, making cyberbullying a crime.  A Cohoes youth was arrested under that county law for a Facebook page targeting other youth; that case will now be considered by the state’s top court in a three-tiered system, the Court of Appeals.
The youth pleaded guilty in Cohoes City Court to Albany County Local Law #11 of 2010, making it a misdemeanor to engage in cyberbulling in the county, according to Court of Appeals spokesman Gary Spencer. The case, which will be heard some time next year, he said, is a constitutional challenge to the law and to the way it was applied in this case; the challenge alleges that the county law is a violation of First Amendment rights.
Guilderland had created a policy on cyberbullying well before the state enacted the Dignity for All Students Act in 2012, requiring  districts to come up with policies that dealt with cyberbullying both on and off school grounds.
The Guilderland policy specifies that cyberbullying and threats can occur on or off school property, both during and outside school hours. “Even if a student receives a threatening message at home, such message can directly impact the psychological and emotional well being of that individual,” it says.
The policy defines cyberbullying and cyberthreats; encourages victims to go to adults, like parents or teachers; and creates a process through which the victims can get help.
Roger Ginder, who heads the Community Services Unit for the Guilderland Police, described the rap recording as “pretty obscene and vulgar.” He also said, “It’s disheartening to the parents of the victims.”
Ginder said the recording featured just a single still photo of the Guilderland High School sign.
A parent of one of the students named in the audio clip called the Guilderland Police Department about it on Tuesday morning, Ginder said, and the investigation is being handled by the school resource officer, Nick Ingle.
Ingle did not return a call seeking comment yesterday.
Ginder also said it was his understanding that, while the school requested of YouTube that the clip be removed, it was one of the posters who ultimately removed it.
Ginder said that the Guilderland Police have been conferring with the Albany County District Attorney’s Office to see if arrests can be made or if “it falls under freedom of speech.”
Cecilia Walsh, spokeswoman for the district attorney’s office, said, “This is ongoing so our office is unable to comment.”
Ginder also said, “People have to realize things placed on the Internet are there forever…Often kids think because they’re anonymous, they can’t be traced.”
He went on about online postings, “Things they say or do can be hurtful. It’s not like years ago with a rumor that disappears after a week. It stays out there.”
Asked how the four accused students were found, Lutsic said only, “It was brought to our attention.”
He went on, “The vast majority are appalled by this happening and would do the right thing.”
Asked for the boys’ reaction, Lutsic said, “All did say it was a mistake.”
A superintendent’s hearing will determine any further disciplinary actions from the school.
Lutsic noted the school year starts with assemblies that, among other things, cover Dignity for All Students Act regulations and cyberbullying.
Lutsic sent a letter to parents dated Nov. 12 that said, “Earlier today, school officials were notified that an explicit audio clip had been posted to the website YouTube containing the names of several Guilderland High School students. The clip contained obscene and harassing language, and as a result, the district has contacted YouTube to request that the audio clip be removed from the website immediately.
“We take very seriously our responsibility to provide a safe learning environment for our students….” (See related story on school safety at Guilderland.)
Counseling has been offered to the victims, said Lutsic, and he and the school superintendent, Marie Wiles, held a press conference about the matter Wednesday afternoon because they had received so many calls from the media.
Editor’s note: Melissa Hale-Spencer is married to the Court of Appeals spokesman.

Sunday, November 3, 2013

WHAT IS CYBER BULLYING

Hon. Brian Scavo expert on Cyber bullying and School bullying

DONATE HERE

Brian Scavo has taken direct action against cyber bullying by creating the toughest law against cyber bullying  in New York State!

Cyber bullying involves being intentionally hurtful of other people through electronic            communication. It can take place through a variety of digital means. The goal of cyber bullies is generally to intimidate the victim or damage her reputation.
Cyber bullies may instigate or escalate arguments by text message or chat. They can send harassing emails. Some cyber bullies spread gossip or rumors on social networking sites or other websites.
Identity theft is sometimes also involved in cyber bullying. Bullies pretend to be someone else and send or post material as that person. Some bullies pretend to befriend the victim in order to obtain private information which they then share publicly.
Girls will often cyber bully through social exclusion. For example, one girl in a group might be ostracized and "unfriended" on social networking sites.
In extreme cases, cyber bullying can turn into cyber stalking. These cases involve threats that can leave the victim feeling very fearful.
Cyber bullying often escalates quickly and more severely than regular bullying because the perpetrators do not see the emotional toll that they take on the victim. Some bullies act anonymously, leaving even more room for cruelty behind an electronic veil.
Sources: DONATE HERE
University of Massachusetts Medical School. Parent Guide to Cyberbullying and Cyberthreats. Accessed August 24, 2013.
Also Known As: cyber stalking, electronic harassment
Related Articles

A LOCAL LAW PROHIBITING CYBER-BULLYING IN ALBANY COUNTY 

 Introduced: 7/12/10 
 By Messrs. Brian Scavo, 

BE IT ENACTED BY THE COUNTY LEGISLATURE OF THE COUNTY OF 
ALBANY, as follows: 

Section 1. Legislative Intent. 

This Legislature hereby finds and determines that bullying is a long-standing 
problem among school-aged children in Albany County and throughout the nation 
and with the advent of technology, bullying has transformed from a predominantly 
school-based issue to a broader societal problem. 

This Legislature further finds and determines that cyber-bullying, which 
consists of non-physical bullying behaviors transmitted by electronic means, is the 
newest form of harassment. 

This Legislature finds that cyber-bullying is rampant: forty two percent 
(42%) of children in the fourth through eighth grade surveyed in a recent poll 
reported being bullied online. 

This Legislature determines that cyber-bullying follows its victims 
everywhere they go and can occur at any time of the day or night, as it is 
perpetrated online and/or through text and picture messages on cellular phones and 
handheld devices. 

This Legislature also finds that perpetrators of cyber-bullying are often more 
extreme in the threats and taunts they inflict on their victims, as they do not 
actually see their victim's emotional reaction to the abuse and believe they are 
anonymous. 

This Legislature further finds that victims of cyber-bullying suffer very real 
and serious harm as a result of these incidents, often showing signs of depression, 
anxiety, social isolation, nervousness when interacting with technology, low self 
esteem, and declining school performance. 
 This Legislature also determines that, in some cases, victims attempt or 
commit suicide in part because of the cyber-bullying they've endured. 

This Legislature further determines that several states have enacted laws 
criminalizing cyber-bullying but, to date, the New York State Legislature has failed 
to address this problem. 

This Legislature finds that Albany County should do everything in its power 
to protect its residents from such reprehensible behavior. 

Therefore, the purpose of this law is to ban the cyber-bullying in the County 
of Albany. 

Section 2. Definitions. 
As used in this law, the following terms shall have the meanings indicated: 

"CYBER-BULLYING" shall mean any act of communicating or causing a 
communication to be sent by mechanical or electronic means, including posting 
statements on the internet or through a computer or email network, disseminating 
embarrassing or sexually explicit photographs; disseminating private, personal, 
false or sexual information, or sending hate mail, with no legitimate private, 
personal, or public purpose, with the intent to harass, annoy, threaten, abuse, 
taunt, intimidate, torment, humiliate, or otherwise inflict significant emotional 
harm on another person. 

"MINOR" shall mean any natural person or individual under the age of eighteen 
(18). 

"PERSON" shall mean any natural person, individual, corporation, unincorporated 
association, proprietorship, firm, partnership, joint venture, joint-stock association, 
or other entity or business organization of any kind. 

Section 3. Prohibitions. 
No person shall engage in cyber-bullying against any minor or person in the 
County of Albany. 

Section 4. Penalties. 
Any person who knowingly violates the provisions of this local law shall be 
guilty of an unclassified misdemeanor punishable by a fine of up to $1,000 and/or up 
to one year imprisonment. 

Section 5. Applicability. 
This law shall apply to all actions occurring on or after the effective date of 
this law.  


Section 6. Reverse Preemption. 
This law shall be null and void on the day that statewide or federal 
legislation goes into effect, incorporating either the same or substantially similar 
provisions as are contained in this local law or in the event that a pertinent state or 
federal administrative agency issues and promulgates regulations preempting such 
action by the County of Albany. The County Legislature may determine via mere 
resolution whether or not identical or substantially similar statewide legislation has 
been enacted for the purposes of triggering the provisions of this section. 

Section 7. Severability. 
If any clause, sentence, paragraph, subdivision, section, or part of this law or the 
application thereof to any person, individual, corporation, firm, partnership, entity, 
or circumstance shall be adjudged by any court of competent jurisdiction to be 
invalid or unconstitutional, such order or judgment shall not affect, impair, or 
invalidate the remainder thereof, but shall be confined in its operation to the clause, 
sentence, paragraph, subdivision, section, or part of this law, or in its application to 
the person, individual, corporation, firm, partnership, entity, or circumstance 
directly involved in the controversy in which such order or judgment shall be 
rendered. 

Section 8. Effective Date. 
This law shall take effect immediately upon its filing in the Office of the Secretary 
of State. 

 Referred to Law Committee. 7/12/10 
Favorable Recommendation - Law Committee. 9/27/10 
Referred to Law Committee. 10/12/10 
Favorable Recommendation - Law Committee. 10/25/10 

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